What to expect when looking for a place to live

Although the number of student apartments in Aarhus has grown significantly, finding a place to live as a student can still be difficult - also for Danish students.

It is unlikely that you will find a place of your own that is also affordable. Most students live in dorms /kollegiums or a shared apartment. Finding a room in a shared apartment with access to a shower and a kitchen and approximately 30-40 minutes of transport to your university means that you're living under the same conditions as most of your fellow Danish students. 

Moving further away from the city will save you money on rent, but take into account the extra costs of transportation. 

Residential halls and dorms (kollegium)

Some residential halls are part of the university / school of higher education, some are independent. They are located throughout the city and house students from a variety of schools og higher education. Living here is a good way to meet friends outside of your study.

In residential halls you will most often have a single room and share a big kitchen with 3-25 other people. Some residential halls offer apartments, either with your own kitchen and/or bathroom, or apartments where you share kitchen, bathroom and a common area with 2-5 other people. 

Admittance to a residential hall are usually determined by a waiting list, but some of them accept new residents based on motivated applications. 

Danish students living in residential halls often sublet their room while staying for a semester abroad. 

Check out https://ungdomsboligaarhus.dk for independent halls of residence in Aarhus, and ask the international office at your university / school if your school has a university dorm.   

Shared flats, renting, sublets and rooms

Most of the Danish students who do not live in dorms or in residential halls often live in shared flats or sublets owned by private landlords. 

When searching online for private accomodation please be aware of potential scam.